Elissa Gallien via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Every Tuesday we hear from students and listeners as they send in weekly Phenology observations.  Spring is here.  These listener and student reports include irises poking thru the ground, tree swallows, snowshoe hares changing colors, flocks of snow buntings, turkey vultures, wood frogs and even some open water!  Our phenologists did some incredible reporting during this action packed week! 

Harvey Tjader via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

We care deeply about the natural world around us here at KAXE-KBXE.  Each week our resident phenologist John Latimer's Phenology Report provides a comprehensive look at what's  happening in nature here in northern Minnesota.  Snowstorms, catkins, warm days, and mating owls are all part of this wide ranging spring report. Check it out!

What are you noticing?  Send us a note via email or leave a voicemail at 218.999.9876.  We'd love to hear about it.   

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Heidi Holtan: Listening to dig deep on Northern Community radio. I'm Heidi Holton with Aaron Brown or liberal commentator and Chuck Marohn  is our conservative commentator today. We are talking about. Small towns. Our small towns of northern Minnesota and how to get things done. Is there a Magic Bullet? We in our prior conversations about what a university of four-year University be that silver bullet that would change everything.

How do you start having these conversations?

Ely writer, DyAnne Korda weaves together the revelatory and the succinct into a poem about healing called "Guadalupe and Burdock." You can find more of her words at www.sleddogmoon.com.

We spoke with Mark Lelwica from the Roundhouse Brewery in Brainerd recently.  He told us how he got into being a brewmaster, what life is like at the Roundhouse Brewery and what's brewing right now.   Tonight, all Brainerd listeners are welcome to stop by the Northern Community Radio Community Advisory meeting which will happen at the Roundhouse Brewery from 5:30 - 7pm.  We'd love to meet you and hear your thoughts about our programming.  Stop by the Roundhouse Brewery tonight!

Anton Treuer on Call of the Wild

Apr 23, 2018

Milt Lee interviews Anton Treuer, author and professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University.  Dr. Treuer tells the story of how he navigated through a few of his own early obstacles to arrive where he is today.

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*Dig Deep – Where Is the White Knight in our Small Towns of Minnesota? Pt. 1

Heidi:  You're listening to Dig Deep on Northern Community Radio it's where we pair conservative commentator Chuck Marohn with our liberal commentator Aaron Brown. Thanks for being back you guys. I'm Heidi Holtan.

In celebration of Earth Day, all humans are invited to stop by Hobson Union on the Bemidji State University campus Sunday, April 22 between 12:30 and 3:30p.m.  The Bemidji State University  Sustainability Coordinator Erica Bailey-Johnson stopped by to tell us all about it.

John Bauer

Program 66:  Impact of World War II on the Paper Company

A radio series produced by historian Don Boese.   Don is the author of eight books dealing with local history in Itasca County, including "John C. Greenway and the Opening of the Western Mesabi", and the main source for this series,  "Papermakers: the Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota".

When you think of breakfast, the first thing that comes to mind might not be instant oatmeal, but that's what Amy Baasi of Cherry offered up when she joined Heidi and John for breakfast (since Rob forgot). Weekends are for real, yummy oatmeal, but instant makes an easier start to a busy day. Either way, it all starts with a handy red teapot.

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Latest News from National Public Radio

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported an unusual discovery on Monday. The founder, editor and columnist of a website that bills itself as a resource for student loan news does not exist.

When it comes to the nitty, gritty details, life in antiquity was pretty stinky – in a literal sense. Without high food and personal hygienic standards, most people probably contracted an intestinal worm at some point or another, says veterinary scientist Martin Søe. "I think it's fair to say it was very, very common. In places with low hygienic standards, you still have a lot of whipworm and round worm."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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