Tammy Bobrowsky

February can be a long cold month to get through in northern Minnesota.  We think the best way we can get through it is to band together as a community and....READ!  How many books do you think we can read? 100?  500?  How many books do you read in a month? 

Katie Carter

    

Women's Marches took place across the world Saturday.  Australia, Qatar, France, Calgary, and Guatemala are just a few places around the globe that people marched.   Across the United States, people marched. in Minnesota, people marched in solidarity in communities across the state including Bemidji, Mankato, Duluth and Longville.  A bus load of women and girls left Bemidji at 5:00 Saturday morning and headed south to March in St. Paul Women's March.  In this Area Voices segment, find out why they went and how it turned out.  

Men, women and children from across northern Minnesota participated in women's marches today. Some did so in their home towns and some traveled as far as Washington DC. Each one marched for his or her own reason.  We're collecting a photo album and asking northern Minnesotans why they participated. 

Tell us why you marched and attach a photo! Send it to comments@kaxe.org and we will add yours to our album.

Adam Levy In Studio

Jan 20, 2017

We had the first concert Thursday night for the 2017 portion of our CenterStage MN Concert Series with The Reif Center. The Honeydogs were here, and man, they were great. Have you seen them? I knew the band was going to be fun when I walked backstage into a flying Millennium Falcon with the guitar player doing high kicks to try and knock it down. They brought that kind of energy and level of fun onto the stage throughout the performance.

https://alceehastings.house.gov/

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Aaron Brown - MinnesotaBrown.com

In this  conversation Aaron Brown and Chuck Marohn talk about where rural towns are right now, and where they think they are going.  And yes, they have hope.

Phenology Talkbacks

Jan 19, 2017
Marcia Adair via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

    Each week we hear from listeners around the region as they connect with us to share their observations, questions and comments about what they are noticing out in the natural world.  It was an interesting week!  We learned about a young girl who tried to capture a mouse in her bedroom only to discover it was a vole, a  rare siting of a curved billed thrasher which is a bird normally residing in the southwest United States,  chipmunks filling their cheeks, and a whole bunch of other things going on outside!  Check out the audio files to learn more.  

Bruce O'theshire Brummitt via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB page

John Latimer, our resident phenologist, is passionate about nature.   He's been documenting the subtle biological events of nature as they relate to climate for more than 30 years.  Click on the link to hear his full phenology report for this week!   Pussy willows, barred owls eating voles, and scat trails are just a few of the highlights of this full report!   

Aaron Brown - MinnesotaBrown.com

Part 2 of our Dig Deep conversation this week gets into how the presidential campaigns of 2016 spoke to people in rural areas and also asks the question "does anybody outside of here really care?" 

There are over 3,000 archaeological sites in northern Minnesota’s Chippewa National Forest, covering a range of time from just after the Ice Age (10,000 years ago) to the early 20th century. The sites include early logging camp sites, fur trade sites, recreational sites, and sites reflecting Ojibwe and Dakota heritage.

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NPR stories

Hopes are dwindling that anyone trapped in an avalanche-buried ski resort could still be alive after six days, as multiple news reports said the death toll has risen to at least 15.

Rescue workers facing "extreme conditions" continue to dig through the rubble, searching for the 14 people still said to be missing.

You've probably heard of antibiotic resistance — germs that can resist the drugs designed to wipe them out.

Now there's a new kind of resistance to worry about — fungal infections that are resistant to treatment.

In 1755, the board of governors of a new college was sworn into office in Manhattan. King's College, as it was called, was not far from the municipal slave market at Wall and Pearl streets in New York City.

The man presiding over the ceremony was Daniel Horsmanden, a colonial supreme court justice who had previously presided over the trial of alleged slave conspirators. One of the men he swore in as a governor of the new college was Henry Beekman, whose merchant family owned and traded slaves.

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The Fruit Bats', music of Eric D. Johnson, 17th album, filled with previously unreleased originals, select covers, and instrumentals.

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