John Bauer

Program 23: The Growth of the Paper Industry in the U.S. 1870 - 1900

A radio series produced by historian Don Boese.   Don is the author of eight books dealing with local history in Itasca County, including "John C. Greenway and the Opening of the Western Mesabi", and the main source for this series,  "Papermakers: the Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota".

www.timberjay.com

This week Timberjay publisher and editor Marshall Helmberger on a new buyer for the Vermilion marina, a phishing hassle in Greewood Township , public hearings from the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management and MN Power's plan for renewables by 2025. 

You can hear the Border News Roundup Friday mornings at 7:20. 

 Headwaters School of Music and the Arts hosts its annual Fiddle Camp this week in Bemidji.

Grant Frashier

Host Grant Frashier talks with Doug Workman and Becky Peterson about the Vermilion Cultural Center project and their Seasons of Broadway fundraiser which will be held Saturday, June 17th in Tower, MN.

Last week on Dig Deep we talked infrastructure.  In our final conversation we talked about the modern version of infrastructure Broadband.  Bernadine Joselyn was in the studios to elaborate on Chuck and Aaron's discussion. 

www.benjaminludwig.com

This is the story of Ginny Moon - a new Young Adult Novel by Benjamin Ludwig

To Ginny, a child with autism, the word Forever means until the police come.

For many of us summer is a time to read, but read a little differently.  I just went on a road trip and picked up some new books to read - and I purposely chose things I don't always read.  I've got a few books going, but my favorite right now is David Sedaris's "Theft By Finding Diaries 1977-2002".  Most of us first fell for David Sedaris with his amazing holiday time NPR Santaland Diaries.  Or on

Cook Minnesota is located at the intersection of US Highway 53 and MN Hwy 1 in St Louis County. Cook is the western gateway to Lake Vermilion country . This small town is known for resorts, stores, and restaurants—but not necessarily for its growing season.

  Mark Bridge lives in Park Rapids.  He's a musician, a historian, a history re-enactor, a chef and a revivalist of recipes from days long gone by.   We spoke on the morning show about his experience as a historical re-enactor and about an exciting project he's embarked on with the National Park Service.  He's been commissioned to re-create recipes written by Mrs. Augusta Kohrs, wife of a Montana cattle king and hostess on a ranch that spanned more than one million acres.

Brent Olson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch Facebook Page

Every Tuesday, we take a close look at the natural world during our Phenology Show!  In this segment we assess what is blooming,  moving, flying, changing and a whole bunch of other interesting things going on out in nature!  Listen closely and you can discover what prunescence is!  What have you been noticing?  We'd love to hear about it.

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Balloons, body paint, joy and mourning — across the world Sunday, Muslims gathered to celebrate the end of the holy month of Ramadan, and the festivities took nearly as many shapes as the places they were held.

An eight-hour cease-fire declared by the Philippine military ended abruptly on Sunday. As soon as the "humanitarian pause" reached its designated end, though, Marawi descended back into the gunfire that has pervaded the southern city for more than a month.

Will arming teachers make schools safer? While that debate continues across the country, this week more than a dozen school employees from around Colorado spent three days learning advanced gun skills at a shooting range outside of Denver.

With 2,500 inmates, the penitentiary institution of Fresnes, about 20 miles south of Paris, is one of the largest prisons in Europe. Like most French prisons, Fresnes is overcrowded. Built in the late 19th century, its tiny cells, each meant for one prisoner, most often house three.

Inmates scream curses and catcalls from their barred windows as I visit a small, empty sports yard ensconced between cell blocks. Plastic bags and punctured soccer balls are caught in the surrounding concertina wire.

Ernest Littlebird put his grill out on the side of Route 39 in Lame Deer, Mont., under the shade of a tree and started grilling hamburgers.

"Come get a dollar burger," he says. "Good meal, you know, something to put in the belly at least."

Littlebird is an entrepreneur. This is his second year selling dollar hamburgers out of his minivan when he couldn't find other work. Jobs are scarce here on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and so is money.

But Littlebird thinks they don't have to be.

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