Michelle DeVries via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch Page

Every Tuesday we combine all the phenology notes people have phoned, emailed, texted or sent in via mail-carrier and present them to you during the "talkback" section of the Tuesday Phenology show.  This week was a busy one out in nature... maple trees being buzzed by bees, cicadas calling, turtles laying eggs, dragonflies, butterflies, spiders, and more were all reported to us!  Click on the link for the full report.  

www.outfront.org

 Outfront MN has a mission to create a state where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are free to be who they are, love who they love, and live without fear of violence, harassment or discrimination. 

In May Outfront visited schools in northern MN and stopped by our studios. 

www.lyndavmapes.com

Lynda V. Mapes is the environmental reporter for the Seattle Times. She researched and wrote Witness Tree while a Knight Fellow in science journalism at MIT and a Bullard Fellow in forest research in residence with her oak at the Harvard Forest.

While talking about pow wows with professor and author Anton Treuer, we got off on the topic of Native Americans and the US Military.  Did you know that more natives serve in the armed services per capita than any other ethnic group?  Click on the link for our conversation.   

John Bauer

Program 22: Women of Grand Rapids, 1902

A radio series produced by historian Don Boese.   Don is the author of eight books dealing with local history in Itasca County, including "John C. Greenway and the Opening of the Western Mesabi", and the main source for this series,  "Papermakers: the Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota".

Aaron Brown has been a strong advocate for rural broadband.  Chuck?  Not quite as much.  Listen to this conversation and let us know what you think! 

Don't forget to sign up for the Dig Deep podcast! 

Grant Frashier

Close to Home host Grant Frashier goes deep underground for this story as he visits 

Underground Mine State Park.

This week on Centerstage Minnesota the guests live in the neighborhood--except the guy from Norway. Hear an interview with local musicians Barit Dybing and Caige Jambor and their Norwegian friend Erlend Odnes Kløvning about their band project Bare Land.

In our second Dig Deep conversation this week we talk transportation.  Conservative commentator Chuck Marohn posed this:  Are we trying to connect places or are we trying to build places?  He and liberal commentator Aaron Brown dig deep into roads and highways and what the costs are to our communities. 

Sign up for the Dig Deep podcast!

Elissa Gallien via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology is the biological nature of events as they relate to climate.   Today's report includes all kinds of action.  Turtles are on the move and we hope people are watching out for them along the highways.  Trees and shrubs are flowering like crazy and the wildflowers are creating quite a gorgeous spectacle!  To many people's chagrin, the horseflies, deerflies and mosquitos are back in full force.  It really is a phenomenal time to live in northern Minnesota!  Click on the link for the full report that includes a sweet lesson in baby turtles.  

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Latest News from National Public Radio

Balloons, body paint, joy and mourning — across the world Sunday, Muslims gathered to celebrate the end of the holy month of Ramadan, and the festivities took nearly as many shapes as the places they were held.

An eight-hour cease-fire declared by the Philippine military ended abruptly on Sunday. As soon as the "humanitarian pause" reached its designated end, though, Marawi descended back into the gunfire that has pervaded the southern city for more than a month.

Will arming teachers make schools safer? While that debate continues across the country, this week more than a dozen school employees from around Colorado spent three days learning advanced gun skills at a shooting range outside of Denver.

With 2,500 inmates, the penitentiary institution of Fresnes, about 20 miles south of Paris, is one of the largest prisons in Europe. Like most French prisons, Fresnes is overcrowded. Built in the late 19th century, its tiny cells, each meant for one prisoner, most often house three.

Inmates scream curses and catcalls from their barred windows as I visit a small, empty sports yard ensconced between cell blocks. Plastic bags and punctured soccer balls are caught in the surrounding concertina wire.

Ernest Littlebird put his grill out on the side of Route 39 in Lame Deer, Mont., under the shade of a tree and started grilling hamburgers.

"Come get a dollar burger," he says. "Good meal, you know, something to put in the belly at least."

Littlebird is an entrepreneur. This is his second year selling dollar hamburgers out of his minivan when he couldn't find other work. Jobs are scarce here on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and so is money.

But Littlebird thinks they don't have to be.

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