Choreographer Penelope Freeh and Composer Jocelyn Hagen crafted a dance opera about the Wright brothers, their sister and flight.  In this segment of Area Voices Freeh shares background of the project and how it came to be. 

A lifelong and accomplished poet, Donna Salli's first novel A Notion of Pelicans hit bookstores in September.   In this segment of Area Voices we learn about her longtime love of language and her leap from poems to books.

Contemporary Ojibwe Artist Jim Denomie uses his art as a means of social and cultural commentary.  In this segment of Area Voices, he discusses his craft, his intent and how re-discovering his identity helped him navigate through life. 

Artist Jessie Marianiello talks about her path as an artist and the roads she's traveled that have taken her to the lands of wild horses and on to Africa.  Her nonprofit The Joy Collective helps Ugandan widows rebuild their lives through education, creativity and agriculture.

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Each week we call one of our members and ask them "What's For Breakfast?".  Today, after many flubbed phone calls by John Bauer we talked to Chris who was in Brandywine, Maryland.  Thanks to Homestead Mills for sponsoring What's For Breakfast every Friday! 

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.  What you eat matters and what you choose for media matters!  Thanks for listening, and thanks for being a member...Call us if you and become a member, and a guest on What's For Breakfast.  800-662-5799.

On our weekly segment Making Sausage we find out about the messy business of government and politics.  We also meet our elected officials and find out about elections and voting.  This week, longtime DFL commentator and election judge Colleen Nardone on what the constitutional amendment on the ballot is all about.  One thing we know:  if you don't vote for it you are voting NO.  The questions is:  should MN Legislators have the ability to raise their own salaries?

Milt Lee talks to Jenn Anderson about her work in Uganda and at The Least of These, a social change boutique located in downtown Bemidji.

Jim Gallagher

Jim Gallagher talks with Brainerd resident Barry Christenson about the Minnesota Wooden Canoe Heritage Association and his fleet of vintage wooden canoes.

Steve Downing

Steve visits the Edge Center for the Performing Arts in Big Fork, to see Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater and also John Bauer's Exhibit "What's Left: Lives Touched by Suidice".

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