Artist Jessie Marianiello talks about her path as an artist and the roads she's traveled that have taken her to the lands of wild horses and on to Africa.  Her nonprofit The Joy Collective helps Ugandan widows rebuild their lives through education, creativity and agriculture.

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Each week we call one of our members and ask them "What's For Breakfast?".  Today, after many flubbed phone calls by John Bauer we talked to Chris who was in Brandywine, Maryland.  Thanks to Homestead Mills for sponsoring What's For Breakfast every Friday! 

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.  What you eat matters and what you choose for media matters!  Thanks for listening, and thanks for being a member...Call us if you and become a member, and a guest on What's For Breakfast.  800-662-5799.

On our weekly segment Making Sausage we find out about the messy business of government and politics.  We also meet our elected officials and find out about elections and voting.  This week, longtime DFL commentator and election judge Colleen Nardone on what the constitutional amendment on the ballot is all about.  One thing we know:  if you don't vote for it you are voting NO.  The questions is:  should MN Legislators have the ability to raise their own salaries?

Milt Lee talks to Jenn Anderson about her work in Uganda and at The Least of These, a social change boutique located in downtown Bemidji.

Jim Gallagher

Jim Gallagher talks with Brainerd resident Barry Christenson about the Minnesota Wooden Canoe Heritage Association and his fleet of vintage wooden canoes.

Steve Downing

Steve visits the Edge Center for the Performing Arts in Big Fork, to see Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater and also John Bauer's Exhibit "What's Left: Lives Touched by Suidice".

Wolf.org

Grant Frashier visits with Cameron Feaster, wolf specialist at the International Wolf Center in Ely, MN.

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The Dakota Access Pipeline expansion and the protests against it have garnered local, national and world-wide attention since summer. In this segment of Area Voices, host Katie Carter talks with professor and author Anton Treuer who's written several books, one of which is titled Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask. Katie asked Dr. Treuer about the Dakota Access Pipeline project and asked him about its impact on the Native community and much more. Their conversation will be broken into segments.

Daily Phenology: October 18

Oct 18, 2016

This date in phenology history.

Karen Smilanich Oothoudt‎

Lots of changes happening around us.  Today's Talkbacks came from the following classrooms:

  • Mr. Adams - 4th Grade at Northern Elementary in Bemidji
  • Mr. Linders - 5th Grade at RJE Middle School in Grand Rapids
  • Mrs. Teigte Class from near Two Harbors
  • Mr. Holmes - 5th Grade Roosevelt Elementary in Virginia

We also heard from our friend Ed Dallas in Deerwood.

To share your nature notes check out the KAXE/KBXE Season Watch Page on facebook or call 218-999-9876.

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An eight-hour cease-fire declared by the Philippine military ended abruptly on Sunday. As soon as the "humanitarian pause" reached its designated end, though, Marawi descended back into the gunfire that has pervaded the southern city for more than a month.

Will arming teachers make schools safer? While that debate continues across the country, this week more than a dozen school employees from around Colorado spent three days learning advanced gun skills at a shooting range outside of Denver.

With 2,500 inmates, the penitentiary institution of Fresnes, about 20 miles south of Paris, is one of the largest prisons in Europe. Like most French prisons, Fresnes is overcrowded. Built in the late 19th century, its tiny cells, each meant for one prisoner, most often house three.

Inmates scream curses and catcalls from their barred windows as I visit a small, empty sports yard ensconced between cell blocks. Plastic bags and punctured soccer balls are caught in the surrounding concertina wire.

Ernest Littlebird put his grill out on the side of Route 39 in Lame Deer, Mont., under the shade of a tree and started grilling hamburgers.

"Come get a dollar burger," he says. "Good meal, you know, something to put in the belly at least."

Littlebird is an entrepreneur. This is his second year selling dollar hamburgers out of his minivan when he couldn't find other work. Jobs are scarce here on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and so is money.

But Littlebird thinks they don't have to be.

The man who fought to make child labor a crime against humanity came to Washington, D.C., last week with a message for America and its new president.

Kailash Satyarthi, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 for his efforts to end child labor, urged U.S. lawmakers to fight for the freedom of 168 million children forced to work due to poverty, trafficking or slavery.

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