NPR News

European law enforcement agencies say they've arrested the administrators of a website that allowed users to pay to knock selected websites offline.

The site Webstresser.org let paying customers — for as little as 15 euros a month, according to the European law enforcement agency Europol — launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks to shut down websites or Internet users.

President Trump's longtime attorney, Michael Cohen, will invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in a civil lawsuit brought by adult entertainer Stormy Daniels — a move that would prevent him revealing anything that could be used later by federal prosecutors.

"Based on the advice of counsel, I will assert my 5th Amendment rights in connection with all proceedings in this case due to the ongoing criminal investigation by the FBI and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York," Cohen wrote in the filing in Los Angeles federal court.

On Thursday, a Boston city commission is expected to vote on a big battle brewing over a tiny, two-block street.

Yawkey Way, which runs alongside Fenway Park, was named for the late, former Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey, who was known for his philanthropy, but also for his historically racist ball club.

Now, the team's current owners say they are still haunted by Yawkey's legacy, and they want the street renamed, to distance themselves from the team's checkered past.

Scott Pruitt was supposed to spend today on Capitol Hill discussing the Environmental Protection Agency's budget. That may seem an easy task compared to the grilling he's likely to get instead over myriad allegations of improper spending and ethics violations.

It's the first time Pruitt will appear before lawmakers since weeks of accusations prompted a string of investigations — by the EPA Inspector General's office, at the GAO, and in Congress. By this week, even staunch allies like Senator James Inhofe, a Pruitt mentor from his home state of Oklahoma, were expressing concern.

As the wave of teacher walkouts moves to Arizona and Colorado this week, an NPR/Ipsos poll shows strong support among Americans for improving teachers' pay and for their right to strike.

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