Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Erica Garner, a 27-year-old activist whose father's dying words became a rallying cry for protest against police brutality, has been hospitalized in serious condition after a heart attack, according to multiple reports.

Eric Garner, a black man who died in 2014 after a white NYPD officer put him in a chokehold, was recorded repeatedly telling the officer, "I can't breathe." A grand jury did not indict any officers over his death, a decision that prompted protests across the country.

Alexei Navalny, an outspoken critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, will not be allowed to run in next year's presidential election in Russia, officials announced on Monday.

Putin is anticipated to win re-election yet again, continuing nearly two decades of dominance over Russian politics.

"Navalny is implicitly barred from running for office because of a conviction in a fraud case which has been viewed as political retribution," The Associated Press writes. "He could have run if he [were] given a special dispensation or if his conviction was cancelled."


A suicide bomber in Kabul killed at least 6 people in an attack early Monday, near the Afghan intelligence agency.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack through its news agency Amaq.

One of the victims was a woman traveling in a car as it was passing by the site of the explosion, The Associated Press reports.

The exact target of the attack is unclear, the AP says.

Reuters, which confirmed five deaths with the Afghan interior ministry, reports that all of the known victims were civilians.

A winter storm system delivered Christmas Eve snow to Detroit, Chicago and other parts of the Midwest, and is now passing over the Northeast. Snow and sleet also struck some parts of the Pacific Northwest.

That means families in parts of the country woke up to a white Christmas, with corresponding joy or a touch of dread (depending, in no small part, on who has snow-shoveling duties).

And there's more to come for the states north of Pennsylvania.

A horse-drawn carriage company in Philadelphia is shutting down at the behest of city officials, after inspectors found the company was violating building codes and animal welfare laws.

The Philadelphia Carriage Co.'s horses will be handed over to the city and ultimately sent to a sanctuary, The Associated Press reports. The company's closure means one company continues to offer horse-drawn carriage tours in the historic section of the city.

The city has spent six months attempting to get control of the horses, the AP writes.

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