Phenology

Tuesday Mornings

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.  John Latimer shares his phenology notes on what he has been observing this week.

Ways to Connect

Ken Hupila via Season Watch Facebook Page

So many phenology indicators this week  that spring is getting closer and closer!  Starlings, drumming grouse, roosting partridges, otters, fishers, cardinals, and chickadees feeding right out of a child's hands! We heard from the kids at North Shore Community School, Roosevelt Elementary, Robert J. Elkington Middle School this week.  We also got a report from Mark from Effie as well as Jeff from Brainerd, Joel and Dallas.  Thanks to all of you for your great phenology reporting.

Thom Bergstrom via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch page

    

Weekly Phenology

Mar 1, 2017
Bonny Bouta Paetznick via Season Watch FB page

Each week, our resident phenologist John Latimer looks closely at what's happening in the natural world and gives listeners a full report on his observations of the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.   This week's report includes a variety of bird songs, discussion about temperature changes and talk about the effect climate change has had on bird migration.

Dallas Clell Hudson via Season Watch Facebook Group

This week in the Phenology Report,  resident phenologist  John Latimer takes listeners on a bit of an adventure.    In just a few minutes,   we hear him imitate the call of a saw-whet owl,   learn why it's troubling to see a bat at this time of year, listen to the cardinal's song,  find out about porcupines in trees and coyotes' howls, and discover the subtle clues eagles and ravens have for us in terms of our season change.

Dallas Clell Hudson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

  

John Latimer's Phenology Show  is one way Northern Community Radio connects listeners with the northwoods in which we live.  It's one way we connect listeners to each other, as well.  Every Tuesday we hear from classrooms and regular folks reporting the subtle changes they notice in nature.  

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