Phenology Talkbacks

Brent Olson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch Facebook Page

Every Tuesday, we take a close look at the natural world during our Phenology Show!  In this segment we assess what is blooming,  moving, flying, changing and a whole bunch of other interesting things going on out in nature!  Listen closely and you can discover what prunescence is!  What have you been noticing?  We'd love to hear about it.

Michelle DeVries via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch Page

Every Tuesday we combine all the phenology notes people have phoned, emailed, texted or sent in via mail-carrier and present them to you during the "talkback" section of the Tuesday Phenology show.  This week was a busy one out in nature... maple trees being buzzed by bees, cicadas calling, turtles laying eggs, dragonflies, butterflies, spiders, and more were all reported to us!  Click on the link for the full report.  

Dallas Clell Hudson via KAXE/KBXE Season Watch FB Page

    Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.   Talkback is one of the ways we connect with our radio listeners-we encourage people call, email, or send letters with comments questions or observations about our programming or whatever! Every Tuesday around 6:40am we connect phenology with talkback in our Phenology Talkback segment of the morning show.  We hear from all kinds of people across the listening region and we hear from school classrooms as well. People report what they are noticing outside.

Elissa Gallien via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Each week ,our resident phenologist John Latimer compiles a full report of the subtle changes taking place in the natural environment and shares his findings with our radio listeners.  Flowering shrubs, trillium,star flowers, anemone,edible ferns, and a variety of returning birds all make their way into this week's report. It's spring!

Dallas Clell Hudson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Each week our resident phenologist John Latimer reports on the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate in his weekly Phenology Report.  This week, John reports on what he sees up in the trees and down on the forest floor.  Trees are breaking bud, ferns are popping, columbine are exposing themselves and more. 

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