seasons

Lorrene Maroney via Season Watch

  Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.   Several school groups reached out to our phenologist John Latimer this week with reports of all kinds of natural wonders including king fishers, eggs hatching and even snakes.  There is so much going on out in the natural world this time of year. It's a fantastic time to be out and about taking note of all the changes going on!

Dallas Clell Hudson via KAXE/KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology is the biological nature of events as they relate to climate. Every Tuesday, as our resident phenologist, John Latimer said this morning, "we introduce you to the world we live in."  During the "talkback" section of our show, listeners get to be part of telling nature's story...We gather phenology related listener comments, questions and observations and share them.

John Latimer, KAXE-KBXE Season Watch Page

Phenology is the biological nature of events as they relate to nature.  These days the activity in the natural world is profound... sometimes subtle and  requiring a concentrated effort to witness, other times taking over our senses.

Brent Olson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Our resident phenologist John Latimer takes us through the many signs that spring is upon us in this edition of the Phenology Show.   If you love nature and take notice of the subtle changes happening around you, please share your observations with us!  We love to hear what is going on in our listeners' necks of the woods.

John Swartz via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology is the rhythmic, biological nature of events as they relate to climate.  Our resident phenologist John Latimer has been keeping phenology notes for 33 years, documenting the subtle and not so subtle changes he notices in the natural world.  Every week, he gives our listeners a full report of what he's noticing as well as what others have reported.  This week's report is full of hints of spring!  Horned larks, red fox, bluebirds and even the very early wound of a wood frog all make it into this week's report. 

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