John Latimer via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch Page

Each week we take a close look at Phenology which is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate on the Tuesday morning show.  I gather the comments and questions from listeners and present them in the Phenology Talkback portion of the morning show and then I present my weekly findings in my Phenology Report.   This week, all kinds of flowers are blooming and plant life is taking shape.   What have you noticed?   I'd love to hear about it.

Sue Keeler via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology Talkback is your opportunity to  connect with us about what you are noticing out in nature.  Maybe you've got a question, a comment you'd like to share or an observation you had that will add to the phenological story of the week, whatever it is, we want to know about it.  Each Tuesday morning we gather the talkback recordings, notes and emails from our listeners and share them with the world.   We'd love to hear from you!  Send an email or leave us a phone message at 218.999.9876.  

In her poem "This is Not a Test," Lisa Joy Hesse explores choice and not choice

http://melissa-delacruz.com/

Tammy Bobrowsky is our staff librarian who manages our fantastic facebook group of readers.  In addition, she gets a chance to talk with authors about their work.  This week it's young adult author Melissa de la Cruz about "Alex and Eliza" the story of how a young Alexander Hamilton met his wife Elizabeth Schuyler. 

www.kootasca.org

Rural Minnesota is facing a crisis of childcare.  The problems?  Availability and affordability.  Tuesday May 23rd Circles of Support in Grand Rapids is holding a lunchtime conversation" Child Care in Itasca County - Needs, Options, Affordability & Resources.  It's from 11-1pm at the Grand Rapids Area Library - free pizza - RSVP to 999-5883. 

John Bauer

Program 19: Rev. Noah Lathrop continues his first-hand account of paper-making in the new mill in 1902

A radio series produced by historian Don Boese.   Don is the author of eight books dealing with local history in Itasca County, including "John C. Greenway and the Opening of the Western Mesabi", and the main source for this series,  "Papermakers: the Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota".

Sometimes translation isn’t about knowing the vocabulary.  Matthew Miltich tells a story about a bus ride that taught him something about being a foreigner, on his trip to his family homeland in Dalmatia.  Matthew is a writer and musician living in rural Itasca County, and is a frequent contributor to to Stay Human, Sundays at 9 pm, music and spoken word for spirit and courage. 

imdb.com

The Grand Rapids Chapter of NAMI - the National Alliance on Mental Illness is bringing TV and Movie actress Mary Pat Gleason to Grand Rapids (Thursday May 25 at the Reif Center) for her one-woman show about living with bi-polar disorder called "Stopping Traffic"

The New York Times wrote:

Three members of the strings section of the Minnesota Orchestra stopped by the KBXE studio in Bemidji Wednesday.

Grant Frashier

Close to Home visits the Minnesota Fishing Museum in Little Falls.  Host Grant Frashier visits with Executive Director Brenda Perlowski.

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