Maggie Montgomery

General Manager

Maggie is a rural public radio guru; someone who can get you through both minor jams and near catastrophes and still come out ahead of the game. She pens our grants, reports to the Board of Directors and helps guide our station into the dawn of a new era. Maggie is a locavore to the max (as evidenced on Wednesday mornings), brings in months’ worth of kale each fall, has heat on in her office 12 months a year, and drinks coffee out of a plastic 1987 KAXE mug every day. Doting parents and grandparents, she and her husband Dennis live in the asphalt jungle of East Nary.

Ways to Connect

Klockow Brewing Company

Craft breweries are springing up in small towns across the country, and this month Grand Rapids MN is joining the ranks. Klockow Brewing Company is opening on October 28th in a remodeled warehouse at 36 SE 10th Street, just off Highway 169 near Walgreens. Tasha and Andy Klockow (pronounced CLOCK-oh) are the owners. We talked to Andy Klockow on the Wednesday Morning Show.

Jill and Rob Hietala

If you've ever wanted to find out where local food comes from, or if you're interested in becoming a local grower yourself, there's an opportunity to visit Floodwood River Farm between 9 and 11 a.m. this Saturday morning as part of the 4th Annual Iron Range Harvest Festival.

Red Lake Local Foods Initiative

David Manuel is passionate about providing healthy food for the people of the Red Lake Nation. "Food defined our existence," he explains. "We migrated from season to season, making different camps at different locations all around northern Minnesota. All the way up to Rainy River where they speared sturgeon in the spring. We usually went up there after our sugarbush. Our sugarbush is our New Year.

Moon is the new billy goat at Majestic Muse Farm in Cook MN. He came to Majestic Muse from Whispering Meadows Farm, bringing "good milk lines" with him. Lauren Adamczyk, one of the owners of Majestic Muse Farm, describes him as "a character... He loves to sing! He has a high-pitched call. When we walk away from his pasture he calls to us, and he'll sing for--I don't know--about 15 minutes, wondering if maybe we'll come back to him with a treat or just give him some  attention. He loves people."

Jason Helstrom's pastures have so much grass "we don't know what to do with it." It's the result of a  grazing practice he uses on Helstrom Farm in Hibbing  that mimics the eating, trampling and fertilizing actions of the thousands of bison that built the great prairies of this country as they followed the grass through the seasons.

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